WELCOME TO KENYA IN A GLOBALNET-ZERO, CLIMATE-RESILIENT
2050.

Mt Kilimanjaro
A natural landscape for indigenous crops. Accessible healthcare systems built to survive changing climates. And solar infrastructure powering towns and communities.

WHAT KENYA COULD 
BE LIKE IN
 2050

ENERGY

Masai (Maasai) in the savannah, Kenya
“Kenya could fully use its abundant renewable energy to address all its energy needs”
- Workshop Participant

EVIDENCE AND INSIGHTS:

Renewable energy sources – including wind, solar and biofuels – are key to help Kenya adapt to climate change challenges. Infrastructure investments along a net-zero pathway must meet development needs while balancing environmental needs.

IN 2050...

Kenya may be a clean energy powerhouse. Wind and solar power will help meet the energy demands of households, manufacturing and the commercial sector, while surplus energy could be exported to fund economic development.

Hear from our workshop participants

"If we have more renewable energy investment - we’ll have better quality of life all round"
Potato Farmer Harvesting
"
As someone passionate about wildlife, I’d like to see it protected against the competing land uses across the country
- Workshop Participant

FOOD AND LAND

EVIDENCE AND INSIGHTS:

The route to net-zero in Kenya would require the introduction of drought-resistant crops, biogas manure production, efficient water harvesting, storage, and irrigation system with a step toward agroforestry.

IN 2050...

Agriculture in Kenya may involve techniques such as hydroponics and vertical farming, as well as greater use of indigenous and drought-resistant crops. Reforesting initiatives will enhance sustainability and climate resilience, and education programmes and government incentives will empower local communities to conserve ecological assets and create carbon sinks.

WATER

Portrait of a young woman
“We need to prioritise water recycling – particularly for secondary uses like watering plants”
- Workshop Participant

EVIDENCE AND INSIGHTS:

Infrastructure – including new dams, water pans, storage tanks, boreholes and irrigation systems – will play an important role in Kenya’s adaptation to the effects of climate change, ensuring limited water resources are conserved and deployed effectively.

IN 2050...

With underground water storage systems, drip irrigation, and rainwater harvesting, Kenya can make the most of water in limited areas. And new farming practices, like the monitoring of humidity and soil nutrients, will reduce water use in agriculture.

Hear from our workshop participants

“We need to start at the local level, like increasing the mangrove and forest cover, as it acts like a buffer”
A picker holding a tea leaf and an African young boy drinking fresh water on savanna

OTHER HOPES AND IDEAS

  • Electric bikes, extended light rail and other transport infrastructure that enable Kenyans to get around safely in a low-carbon way

  • Proactive healthcare approaches like urban tree cover, walkable cities, and building designs that prevent overheating

  • Restored mangrove forests to mitigate sea surges safeguards Kenya’s coastal biodiversity

  • Small, sustainable changes like using bags made from natural fibres or using bioenergy instead of charcoal for cooking

Read the full Kenya Profile

Download PDF

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

  • This is just a taste of what Kenya could look like in a globally net-zero, climate-resilient future.

  • This is one of six regional visions, which together paint a picture of a feasible and desirable future.

  • Each country’s role in building this future will be different – and it can only be achieved through deep international cooperation.

Find out more about this project
"A more informed society is able to do more and achieve more”.
- Workshop participant